August232014

steampunktendencies:

Goetz Palace

The palace and park Goetz Okocimskich is located very close to the brewery Okocimski, founded in 1845 by a German who came to John the Evangelist Goetz (1815-1893). It was built in 1898 by his son John Albin Goetz Okocimski (1864-1931).

(via pippipcheeriotaaraa)

August142014
August132014
August112014
August102014

zerostatereflex:

Tangible Media

MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

"Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

(via pippipcheeriotaaraa)

August92014

hclib:

Early Stonework Revealed During Downtown Dig

These photos show early Minneapolis stonework revealed during the building excavation going on across the street from Minneapolis Central Library, on the southeast corner of 4th St. and Nicollet Mall (future home of the Xcel Energy corporate headquarters). The exposed wall has since been covered up (not torn down), but it will likely reveal itself again, as the site changes every day.

The site was most recently home to a nearly-50-year-old, 6-story parking ramp with vacant retail below. Prior to that, the old Minneapolis Journal (built in 1889) and Minneapolis Tribune (built in 1884) were located there, on a portion of 4th Street known as Newspaper Row.

These photos were shot from the Preservation Unit on the 5th floor of Central Library during the week of July 7, 2014.

(via stuffaboutminneapolis)

August52014
alamaris:

Let me tell you about the Douaumont Ossuary.
The ossuary is surrounded by 16,000+ graves, so it sits smack dab in the middle of the largest WWI cemetary in France.  There’s even a section for Muslim soldiers, facing Mecca.  Inside, the walls, the alcoves, the ceiling, are all covered with memorial plaques naming deceased soldiers.  It’s absolutely lovely.

Outside, it’s not quiet as warm — it feels very much like a fort or a military building.  (As it should do, since it was initiated by the man who would later build the Maginot Line.)

See those little square windows, just below the gridwork?  Those look into 46 rooms, which collectively represent regions in the 20km area around the battle of Verdun.
If you walk up and peer into those windows, this is what you’ll see:

An approximate total of 130,000 French and German remains are piled beneath the two wings of the ossuary.  Some of the longer bones are stacked, as in the photograph, but most of them are unsorted, and the majority are unknown and unnamed by the plaques in the hall above.
The soldiers who lie here represent only a tiny, tiny percentage of the 9.7 million military casualties.  Many people nowadays feel that the ossuary is macabre, distressing, monstrous — but that’s the point.  It should be monstrous.  It needs to be monstrous.  The clean-cut, sanitized war cemetaries you can find all over Europe are beautiful and respectful, yes, but they are to some extent a myth; beneath many of those crisp white crosses are mass graves.  Here, in Douaumont, the designers of this monument were brave enough to show the truth: here, look, this is industrialized warfare, this is the reality.
I think it’s hard for us to really grasp the death toll of WWI without seeing something like this, especially those of us who look back on the world wars from across a vast bridge of years.  I find the numbers hard to comprehend, without visual context.
There is the context.  No cemetary, no memorial, no list of statistics will ever bring the war home the way this structure does — nothing else will make me understand the way I did when I first saw the rooms beneath Douaumont.

alamaris:

Let me tell you about the Douaumont Ossuary.

The ossuary is surrounded by 16,000+ graves, so it sits smack dab in the middle of the largest WWI cemetary in France.  There’s even a section for Muslim soldiers, facing Mecca.  Inside, the walls, the alcoves, the ceiling, are all covered with memorial plaques naming deceased soldiers.  It’s absolutely lovely.

Outside, it’s not quiet as warm — it feels very much like a fort or a military building.  (As it should do, since it was initiated by the man who would later build the Maginot Line.)

See those little square windows, just below the gridwork?  Those look into 46 rooms, which collectively represent regions in the 20km area around the battle of Verdun.

If you walk up and peer into those windows, this is what you’ll see:

An approximate total of 130,000 French and German remains are piled beneath the two wings of the ossuary.  Some of the longer bones are stacked, as in the photograph, but most of them are unsorted, and the majority are unknown and unnamed by the plaques in the hall above.

The soldiers who lie here represent only a tiny, tiny percentage of the 9.7 million military casualties.  Many people nowadays feel that the ossuary is macabre, distressing, monstrous — but that’s the point.  It should be monstrous.  It needs to be monstrous.  The clean-cut, sanitized war cemetaries you can find all over Europe are beautiful and respectful, yes, but they are to some extent a myth; beneath many of those crisp white crosses are mass graves.  Here, in Douaumont, the designers of this monument were brave enough to show the truth: here, look, this is industrialized warfare, this is the reality.

I think it’s hard for us to really grasp the death toll of WWI without seeing something like this, especially those of us who look back on the world wars from across a vast bridge of years.  I find the numbers hard to comprehend, without visual context.

There is the context.  No cemetary, no memorial, no list of statistics will ever bring the war home the way this structure does — nothing else will make me understand the way I did when I first saw the rooms beneath Douaumont.

(via orlofsky)

August22014

abandonedography:

In Bulgaria, the Buzludzha Monument sits 1441 meters high, on the historic site of the final battle between Bulgarian rebels and the Ottoman Empire in 1868. It was built in 1981, to commemorate the secret meetings of the Bulgarian Social Democratic Party. Which led by Dimitar Blagoev, met in the area to during the parties inception. Abandoned since 1991, it now stands decayed and falling into ruins.

Entering the mists of Buzludzha by Daniel Barter

(via pippipcheeriotaaraa)

July222014

mymodernmet:

Studio Allergutendinge designed the Soul Box, a mobile wooden shelter that can be transported anywhere. The minimalist, two-story building features a kitchen and bed on the lower floor, with a viewing platform on the upper one.

(via pippipcheeriotaaraa)

July212014
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